Copyright

  • This information is quoted from the Barrington 220 Style Manual (pages 1-2). 

    To avoid plagiarism, you must give credit to your sources of information

    When you are researching in books, online databases and on the Internet, you are usually reading other people’s work and ideas. Most of the research you do is this kind. It is perfectly fine to use this information, but you must give credit where credit is due. You must not include ideas in the product of your research – paper, oral presentation, PowerPoint, poster, etc. - that are someone else’s and present them as your own. If you do, you will be guilty of plagiarism – stealing the words or ideas of another without giving them credit. 

    This is not honest, fair or legal. Now is the best time to develop the habit of avoiding plagiarism. At Barrington High School a teacher may give you no credit for a plagiarized paper. If you plagiarize a second time, you may fail th eentire course. Colleges feel so strongly about plagiarizing that they may expel you.
     

    How do you know if you are plagiarizing?

    This is a good self-test: “If you didn’t think of it and write it all on your own, AND you didn’t cite (or write down) the sources where you found the ideas or words, it’s probably plagiarism” (Lathrop and Foss 4.)

    Some common examples of plagiarism:
    1. You turn in a paper or book report that someone else researched and wrote, as your own.
    2. You download text or graphics from the Internet and present it as your own without giving credit.
    3. You quote, paraphrase or summarize text without giving credit.
     
    Sometimes you may not mean to plagiarize, but you are plagiarizing if:
    1. You don’t understand when words you use need to be quoted and given credit.
    2. You don’t know how to cite sources correctly in your paper and bibliography.
    3. You don’t know how to summarize, paraphrase and write about ideas you read.
     
    The Main Things You Need to Know to Avoid Plagiarism
    You don’t have to quote or cite… facts or ideas that most people already know, or that are readily available in encyclopedias, reference books, and textbooks. example: The Statue of Liberty is in New York.
    You do have to quote and cite… facts or ideas that are not commonly known or not readily available in printed and online resources. example: Juvenile asthma attacks have increased 53% since 2001.
     

    Common situations and what you must do to avoid plagiarizing

    If you...

    then you must...

    copy a paragraph directly from a source

    - use quotation marks
    - acknowledge the source in the text
    - cite the source in the bibliography

    copy a paragraph and make small changes

    - acknowledge the source in the text
    - cite the source in the bibliography

    paraphrase a paragraph

    - acknowledge the source in the text
    - cite the source in the bibliography

    create a paragraph by taking phrases from sources and merging them together using words of your own

    - use quotation marks
    - acknowledge the sources in the text
    - cite the sources in the bibliography

    rewrite a paragraph taken from sources but include your own details and examples

    - acknowledge the sources in the text
    - cite the sources in the bibliography

    quote a paragraph directly from a source

    - use quotation marks
    - acknowledge the source in the text
    - cite the source in the bibliography